Officials at Florida’s busiest airport announced that it is becoming the first in the nation to require a face scan of passengers on all arriving and departing international flights, including US citizens. $4 million has been committed to the program.
The face scan technology has been tested out at the airport since late April in an effort to speed up wait times throughout the security check process.
Nine airports already use face scans for some departing international flights but they don’t involve all international flights like the program in Orlando.
Similar technology is being tested out at other airports as well and some airlines have boasted success in boarding their largest planes in under 15-20 minutes thanks to the tech. More »

The Orlando International Airport is aiming to become the first in the country to fully implement the US Customs and Border Protection agency’s Biometric Entry and Exit Program and the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority Board voted to approve $4 million in funding for the effort.

The move will improve efficiency and traveler experience and reduce passenger processing to just 15 minutes per traveler. “With a faster and more secure clearance process, airlines, airports, and travelers will benefit from shorter processing times and standardized arrival procedures,” said Greater Orlando Aviation Authority CEO Phil Brown.

 

According to FindBiometrics.

Dozens of flights are canceled due to winter storm Grayson at Orlando airport Friday.

The powerful winter storm Grayson affected airports in the Midwest and Northeast regions of the country. The storm is now battering the US East Coast with heavy snow and blizzards and flights are canceled and delayed across the country.

 

 

Read more here.

A computer error allowed many pilots at American Airlines to take a vacation over Christmas week. Thousands of flights would be left without pilots during the busy holiday travel period next month.

The scheduling glitch that has allowed American Airlines pilots to schedule time off during the upcoming Christmas season, would create a potential pilot shortage for one of the busiest holidays in years for the airline industry.
Thousands of flights are without pilots for next month, said American Airlines’ pilots’ union.
More than 15,000 flights, from December 17-31 – an upcoming critical holiday period, are at risk after a computer glitch.
The union estimated that some of the flights at some of American Airlines’ biggest hubs will be affected, including Dallas-Fort Worth, Miami, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Chicago, Salt Lake City, and Charlotte, NC. More »

Panic and delays at Orlando International Airport on Friday, November 10, 2017. Thousands of travelers experienced hours of waiting at security checkpoints.

A lithium camera battery overheated and exploded in the main terminal, causing people to panic and the airport to be evacuated. The incident sparked hysteria among passengers.

The explosion happened at 5 p.m. and shortly after the incident, all flights were grounded. Travelers were ordered to disembark planes and those waiting at their gates were forced to pass through TSA security screening again. Hours later, standing in slow-moving lines, annoyed travelers clogged all the terminals.

After the incident, travelers posted on Twitter and other social media that they had fled the airport and feared for their lives. It was said that at least 10 bomb-sniffing dogs were brought into the terminal.

Orlando Police Department posted a message on Twitter denouncing any danger. According to the authorities, there was “no danger to the public” and “NO shots had been fired”.

Airport spokesman Rod Johnson announced the noise was reported in front of the security checkpoint for Gates 1-59. A full ground-stop was issued at 5:30 p.m. and lasted until 9 p.m., said Phil Brown, CEO of the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority. Both terminals A and B were evacuated, and all trams were stopped temporarily. The security checkpoints had to remain closed while the incident was investigated by the authorities. All gates reopened to travelers by 8:45 p.m.

According to Orlando Sentinel.

The battle among three Florida airports about who can use the word “Orlando” in their names continues.

Orlando International Airport is demanding that the Orlando Melbourne International Airport and the Orlando Sanford International Airport remove the ‘Orlando’ name as it claims it misleads passengers. However, it seems the airports will not find a resolution soon.

 

 

Continue reading here.

For the third time in the last five days the new tram stopped working causing headaches for passengers. Hundreds of passengers were forced to take a bus or walk to their gates. Some flights had to be delayed, but yesterday more than 50 travelers missed their flights, according to Executive Director Phil Brown.

 

 

Continue reading here.

National_Airlines_Boeing_757-200_SimonThousands of United Airlines’ passengers across the world were delayed Thursday evening for several hours due to a computer glitch.
The Chicago-based airline confirmed in a statement on its Twitter feed late on Thursday that an issue with its weight reporting system temporarily halted departures. The company apologized for the inconvenience and confirmed they were working “to get customers to their destinations as soon as possible.” More »

Boeing_737-2B7_Adv._US_Air_N279AU,_MCO_Orlando,_FL_(Orlando_International_Airport),_USA_PP1164719158Thursday morning, Orlando International Airport officials announced that the airport will be closed to commercial operations starting at 8 p.m. because of Hurricane Matthew. The announcement was made on the airport’s official twitter page.
An airport spokesman confirmed that OIA will close at 8 a.m. and hopes to reopen on Saturday but only after damage assessment is done. However, Mathhew has been unpredictable until now and it is not known for sure when it will resume flight operations. More »

1google-droneNowadays, drones are widely used by hobbyists for photography and corporations for surveying purposes. The growing use of drones is adding to safety concerns and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, D-Fla. called a meeting of the top executives of seven of Florida’s largest airports. The meeting was held at Orlando International Airport on Friday.

Drones are quickly becoming a threat to airliners and need to be federally regulated to ensure that they don’t get too close to airplanes landing or taking off from airports, More »