Officials at Florida’s busiest airport announced that it is becoming the first in the nation to require a face scan of passengers on all arriving and departing international flights, including US citizens. $4 million has been committed to the program.
The face scan technology has been tested out at the airport since late April in an effort to speed up wait times throughout the security check process.
Nine airports already use face scans for some departing international flights but they don’t involve all international flights like the program in Orlando.
Similar technology is being tested out at other airports as well and some airlines have boasted success in boarding their largest planes in under 15-20 minutes thanks to the tech. More »

The Orlando International Airport is aiming to become the first in the country to fully implement the US Customs and Border Protection agency’s Biometric Entry and Exit Program and the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority Board voted to approve $4 million in funding for the effort.

The move will improve efficiency and traveler experience and reduce passenger processing to just 15 minutes per traveler. “With a faster and more secure clearance process, airlines, airports, and travelers will benefit from shorter processing times and standardized arrival procedures,” said Greater Orlando Aviation Authority CEO Phil Brown.

 

According to FindBiometrics.

Dozens of flights are canceled due to winter storm Grayson at Orlando airport Friday.

The powerful winter storm Grayson affected airports in the Midwest and Northeast regions of the country. The storm is now battering the US East Coast with heavy snow and blizzards and flights are canceled and delayed across the country.

 

 

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Panic and delays at Orlando International Airport on Friday, November 10, 2017. Thousands of travelers experienced hours of waiting at security checkpoints.

A lithium camera battery overheated and exploded in the main terminal, causing people to panic and the airport to be evacuated. The incident sparked hysteria among passengers.

The explosion happened at 5 p.m. and shortly after the incident, all flights were grounded. Travelers were ordered to disembark planes and those waiting at their gates were forced to pass through TSA security screening again. Hours later, standing in slow-moving lines, annoyed travelers clogged all the terminals.

After the incident, travelers posted on Twitter and other social media that they had fled the airport and feared for their lives. It was said that at least 10 bomb-sniffing dogs were brought into the terminal.

Orlando Police Department posted a message on Twitter denouncing any danger. According to the authorities, there was “no danger to the public” and “NO shots had been fired”.

Airport spokesman Rod Johnson announced the noise was reported in front of the security checkpoint for Gates 1-59. A full ground-stop was issued at 5:30 p.m. and lasted until 9 p.m., said Phil Brown, CEO of the Greater Orlando Aviation Authority. Both terminals A and B were evacuated, and all trams were stopped temporarily. The security checkpoints had to remain closed while the incident was investigated by the authorities. All gates reopened to travelers by 8:45 p.m.

According to Orlando Sentinel.

For the third time in the last five days the new tram stopped working causing headaches for passengers. Hundreds of passengers were forced to take a bus or walk to their gates. Some flights had to be delayed, but yesterday more than 50 travelers missed their flights, according to Executive Director Phil Brown.

 

 

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National_Airlines_Boeing_757-200_SimonThousands of United Airlines’ passengers across the world were delayed Thursday evening for several hours due to a computer glitch.
The Chicago-based airline confirmed in a statement on its Twitter feed late on Thursday that an issue with its weight reporting system temporarily halted departures. The company apologized for the inconvenience and confirmed they were working “to get customers to their destinations as soon as possible.” More »

1google-droneNowadays, drones are widely used by hobbyists for photography and corporations for surveying purposes. The growing use of drones is adding to safety concerns and U.S. Senator Bill Nelson, D-Fla. called a meeting of the top executives of seven of Florida’s largest airports. The meeting was held at Orlando International Airport on Friday.

Drones are quickly becoming a threat to airliners and need to be federally regulated to ensure that they don’t get too close to airplanes landing or taking off from airports, More »

800px-Orlando_International_Airport_terminal_from_arriving_airplaneThe USO Central Florida to build a welcome center at the Orlando International Airport.

More than 10,000 soldiers, sailors and marines pass through the airport every week and they are looking for a place to stay between flights.

At more than 160 airports nationwide and around the world, including Germany, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan, United Arab Emirates, and other countries, American troops and their families can find USO welcome centers, where they might connect to loved ones via Internet or phone, play a video game, relax and let their kids play, get a free snack, or have a private farewell. But for Orlano International Airport it will be the first USO welcome center for the past 15 years. More »

800px-Frontier_Airlines_Fawn_Airbus_A318-111_N808FRFrontier Airlines is expanding its services with 42 new non-stop routes across the country, including six new flights to Orlando International Airport. The first new service begins April 14 with flights to Nashville and Raleigh/Durham. The following day April 15, flights to Charlotte and New Orleans take off. Lastly,flights to Dallas and Fort Worth start June 16.
Frontier is also adding non-stop flights between Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport and O’Hare International Airport in Chicago and Orlando International Airport, startig April 15. More »

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOrlando International Airport (MCO) has become the first airport in the United States to add facial recognition technology to its automated passport control (APC) kiosks.

The technology is part of new requirement from U.S. Customs and Border Protection. The APC kiosks are meant to verify people’s identities by matching their faces to the biometric data in the newer passports with a 99.7% successful match rate. The APC kiosks take a snapshot of each traveler’s face and compare the image with biometric record in their e-passports. More »